Posts Tagged ‘coop’

Coop Ideas


Thinking about building a coop? Here are some great ideas with instructions! I love the Hobbit Hole coop.

22-23 September, 2012: UPDATES on Windy City Coop Tour


Come out to see Chicago’s finest… chicken coops! Go from house to house, visiting and chatting with chicken owners and other enthusiasts! This family-friendly event is also bike friendly.

NEW: Home to Roost will be stationed at Location  5 from 10-12 on Saturday and at Location 6 from 12-2 on Sunday.

NEW: Complete information with maps and locations is now on the coop tour webpage. 

 

22-23 September, 2012: Windy City Coop Tour


Come out to see Chicago’s finest… chicken coops! Go from house to house, visiting and chatting with chicken owners and other enthusiasts! This family-friendly event is also bike friendly.

We’re working on getting the event together, so save the date, and keep your eye on the blog for more details. In the meantime, here is the link where all information will be posted: https://sites.google.com/site/chicagochickenenthusi/events/windy-city-coop-tour

 

Automated Coop Door Design


Here is an automated coop door design from a family in the UK that rescue battery-cage hens.

Enjoy!

The Pico-Farm: Rain Barrel, Green Roof, and Coop


A cute three-in-one, eco-friendly coop, the “Pico-Farm” by Southern-Fried Scientist is a chicken coop with a rain barrel to collect water that is used to grow lettuce on the roof. Check out this fun coop! If you’re building a coop, note this important observation: “I originally installed chicken wire, but discovered that foxes and raccoons can shred chicken wire like string cheese, so pulled it all out and replaced it with 1/2 inch hardware cloth.”

Chicken Variance Shot Down in Arlington Heights


I assisted would-be chicken owner Matt Scallon in an unsuccessful petition of the Arlington Heights Village Trustees for a variance to allow him to own chickens. A Trib Local reporter covered the story here. The Tribune’s story is here. 

Naperville Chickens Under Scrutiny


Well, here is another instance of non-chicken-loving sentiments: http://www.wbez.org/story/owning-chickens-scratches-controversy-95624

A quote in the article compares chicken coops to dumpsters and complains of odors – these are comments that suggest that a visit to some chicken coops is in order. Most coops are well kept and do not smell.

All the more reason for chicken owners to practice good animal husbandry and for people who are not chicken friendly to visit a few coops. 

 

 

Home to Roost at Windy City Coop Tour, Sept. 25


Home to Roost will be stationed at location #14 on the Coop Tour at 3532 W. Belden.

For more information on the tour, see Sept. 25, 2011: Windy City Coop Tour (formerly Henapalooza).

See you there

Sept. 25, 2011: Windy City Coop Tour (formerly Henapalooza)


Time: September 25, 2011 from 11am to 2pm

Location: Chicago’s North Side (and surrounding areas), 4134 N. Monticello Ave

Website: Windy City Coop Tour page

 

Phone: 773-640-2402 (for bike tour only)

Thinking of getting chickens or just curious about backyard Chickens in the City of Chicago?   This leisurely bike ride will take you to  a number of Chicago Chicken keepers. The tour is open to all ages, and you will see a large variety of chickens breeds, coop designs, as well as the gardens and yards they occupy. Home to Roost will make an appearance at one of the sites (TBD). Each host will be able to answer questions you may have concerning regulations, feeding, coop designs, space required, egg production, and issues common to chickens in an urban environment.

So save the date of  Sept 25th. This is both a group bike tour and/or a self-guided bike tour.

The group bike tour meets at 4134 N. Monticello  at 10:30 am.  The bike tour starts at 11 am. The biking group tour should last a couple hours and actual length will be determined by the group itself.

The self-guided tour starts at any of the 20+ host sites and just follow the map provided at each site.

The “Windy City Coop Tour” is open as a non-biking event, too.

The Official Windy City Coop Tour hours are 11am – 2 pm  Additional information including web site, press release,  maps, etc. are forthcoming and will be provided on the Windy City Coop Tour page. Not required, but an RSVP to the bike tour will be helpful in planning. We hope you can join us!

Product Review: The Saltbox Coop from My Pet Chicken


A few of my clients have purchased “The Saltbox” coop from the My Pet Chicken site.

I had hoped to provide a product review on the  site, but there is no space to do so. so I’m posting a review below.

I do not recommend the Saltbox coop for a number of reasons.

1. The coop is too small for “3-4 hens” as it is advertised. This coop is not adequate housing for 3-4 hens, with or without a run. This product is poorly categorized and advertised. The following paragraph from the website is misleading:

Designed for up to 4 chickens
With plenty of roosting and nesting space, you can happily house up to four standard-size chickens, or up to six bantams. Keep in mind this coop, like every coop we sell at My Pet Chicken, is NOT intended for full-time confinement. The run is convenient when you can’t let your flock roam freely, but make sure your flock has several hours per day outside.

This coop is too tiny for 1-2 hens, even with a run.

The paragraph that follows recommends it as a broody box or hospital, which is a more accurate description.It also suggests that you’ll get a bigger coop soon.

We love this model for first-timers because it offers inexpensive entree into the hobby. If you’re like most of our customers, you’ll double or triple your flock within a few years, and you’ll end up having to build or buy a larger coop – but you’ll love having this one on hand. Whether you use it to isolate an injured or sick bird, to give a broody hen the space to hatch her own babies, or to transition new juvenile chicks to life “outdoors” while protecting them from your established flock, you’ll always be glad to have it around!

So why spend $400 on this one now? Better to spend a little more or pay someone to make it and get a more permanent solution!

2. The roosting and nesting area is not adequately ventilated. The hens will suffocate or die of heatstroke in the summer if the door is kept closed at night! A good coop needs to have some sort of ventilation/crossbreeze. I was assuming the window could be opened, but it cannot be.

3. The latches on the side doors are not “predator proof,” as advertised. A smart raccoon would figure out how to open these latches. They are well within easy reach of the roof. The kind of latches on the nesting box should be used on all doors to the coop.

4. The predrilled holes for the hardware are not properly placed. Once installed, the latches did not close at all for one of my clients, and the other client has to work at it to get the latch closed on the door to the roost area.

5. The wood splinters easily. My clients had splintering where they inserted the screws, and at the corners of the lift-off nest box lid. A hardwood, rather than a softwood,should have been used.

6. The drop tray is not deep enough to slide out with all the poop and bedding on it. It is far too shallow.It should be 1 1/2 – 2 inches deep to handle chicken litter.

7. There is no room to put the feeding/watering dishes, either hanging or on the ground. The site recommends, and my client purchased, the 11lb plastic feeder. However, if you add that to the enclosed wire area, that reduces the already scarce space. With the feeder and the waterer in this tiny coop, we would be better off raising quail! There is no room for the feeder, waterer, and 2 birds, let alone 4. Also, the frame and wood do not appear adequate to support a hanging feeder. They certainly could not support the hanging waterer.

8. The plastic waterer and feeder barely fit through the door. They have to be tilted sideways to fit through the door.

Poor product, misleading advertising! I’d be suspicious of their other coops’ quality and advertising claims, too.